Archive for the ‘WILDLIFE’ Category

Man Saves Black Bear From Drowning

July 9, 2008

Animal Had Wandered Into Fla. Neighborhood; Bolted Into Gulf Of Mexico After Being Hit With Tranquilizer Dart. A Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) biologist pulled off a daring rescue off the Panhandle — that of a bear.

Officials say a 375-pound male black bear was seen roaming a residential neighborhood, evidently in search of food, near Alligator Point, some 40 miles south of Tallahassee.

The bear was hit with a tranquilizer dart, but he managed to bolt into the Gulf of Mexico before the drugs took effect.

At that point, FWC biologist Adam Warwick jumped in to keep the bear, who was some 25 yards offshore, from drowning. (more…)

Advertisements

HELP founder awarded for commitment to orphaned chimpanzees

July 8, 2008

Aliette Jamart’s untiring commitment to return orphaned chimpanzees back to the wild in Africa, has led to one of the most successful reintroduction programs in conservation history. As a result, she has been awarded the Legion of Honour and ranked as a Chevalier – or Knight – by the Government of France.

Aliette is the founder of HELP-Congo, the Habitat Ecologique et Liberte des Primates sanctuary in the Republic of Congo, which began rescuing orphaned chimpanzees in 1989.

“We are extremely proud of Madame Jamart,” said Doug Cress of PASA, the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance. “Not only did she create a sanctuary in Congo at a time when few existed, she also took the work one step further and proved that chimpanzee reintroductions could work. Today, more than half of our sanctuaries are committed to these programmes and HELP-Congo is still the model we use.” (more…)

Unprecedented attempt to revive Indian tiger population

July 6, 2008

JAIPUR, India – In an unprecedented attempt to revive the tiger population in western India, authorities airlifted a female tiger to a national reserve Friday where it will join a male tiger delivered there last week.

The tigers were carried by Indian Air Force helicopters to Sariska Tiger Reserve in the western state of Rajasthan, whose entire tiger population has been wiped out by poachers in the last five years.

Poaching and a vanishing habitat have savaged Indian tigers, which were believed to number in the tens of thousands a century ago. The tiger population has dropped from nearly 3,600 five years ago to about 1,400, according to the latest tiger census in February.

Environmentalists hailed the airlifting of the tigers from Ranthambore Tiger Reserve, one of India’s most popular places for tourists to see tigers, to Sariska. (more…)

Baby Otters Safe After Excursion, Stop at Pub

July 3, 2008

PETALUMA, CA – Two baby river otters are safely in the care of a wildlife rescue group after a weekend excursion that took them through several Petaluma neighborhoods, including a stop at a local pub.

Residents began calling the Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue hotline Friday night, reporting sightings of the pair slinking across porches and diving under fences.

The first otter was caught Saturday morning after a homeowner caught the animal sleeping between a garbage can and a flower pot. The second one, however, kept moving through town and was spotted by a man outside Mario & John’s Tavern that night. (more…)

A Couple Uproot Their Lives to Create an Animal Sanctuary

July 2, 2008

When she was in her 40s, Alayne Marker occupied an enviable spot. As a contracts and insurance attorney for Boeing in Seattle, Marker raked in big bucks doing work she enjoyed. She regularly jetted off to New York, Los Angeles and Bermuda for meetings; on weekends she exercised, prowled chic stores and plugged into the urban lifestyle.

Now 52, Marker is living and working in an entirely different orbit-in remote Ovando, Mont. (pop. 71), 60 miles from Missoula, the closest city.

Around daybreak each morning, she hauls on her muck boots and strides out of her 1,400-square-foot modular home in the Montana plains to the nearby outbuildings. Marker spends the next 14 hours cleaning crates, shoveling manure and tending to 80 disabled dogs, cats and horses. (more…)

Giraffe Helps Camels, Zebras Escape from Circus

July 2, 2008

AMSTERDAM, Netherlands – Amsterdam police say 15 camels, two zebras and an undetermined number of llamas and potbellied swine briefly escaped from a traveling Dutch circus after a giraffe kicked a hole in their cage.

Police spokesman Arnout Aben says the animals wandered in a group through a nearby neighborhood for several hours after their 5:30 a.m. breakout.

The animals were back at the circus later Monday after being rounded up by police and circus workers with the assistance of dogs. Aben says neighbors fed some of the animals — which he said was a bad idea — but they were tame and nobody was hurt.

Says Aben: ”You have to imagine somebody rubbing his eyes first thing in the morning and saying, ‘Am I seeing things or is that 15 camels walking past?”’

By Associated Press

Cheers as endangered turtle sets off on 20-year journey

July 2, 2008

A 68kg sea turtle raised by humans returned to freedom this week after nine years of captivity, swimming away after the veterinarians who cared for her helped steer her toward the ocean.

Humans have raised the turtle, named Dylan, since she was found in August 1998 as a hatchling straggler on Jekyll Island’s beach, left behind by her nest mates. She spent years at two nature centres before moving to the Georgia Aquarium, and later, the Georgia Sea Turtle Center at Jekyll Island.

The caretakers took the turtle to within 3m of the water and she scooted right in as about 300 people watched from the beach. She took an immediate right turn, swimming parallel to the beach. Terry Norton, head veterinarian at the Sea Turtle Center, helped turn her back out to sea. (more…)

Chimps Calm Each Other with Hugs, Kisses

July 1, 2008

For most folks, a nice hug and some sympathy can help a bit after we get pushed around. Turns out, chimpanzees use hugs and kisses the same way. And it works. Researchers studying people’s closest genetic relatives found that stress was reduced in chimps that were victims of aggression if a third chimp stepped in to offer consolation.

”Consolation usually took the form of a kiss or embrace,” said Dr. Orlaith N. Fraser of the Research Center in Evolutionary Anthropology and Paleoecology at Liverpool John Moores University in England.

”This is particularly interesting,” she said, because this behavior is rarely seen other than after a conflict.

”If a kiss was used, the consoler would press his or her open mouth against the recipient’s body, usually on the top of the head or their back. An embrace consisted of the consoler wrapping one or both arms around the recipient.” (more…)

Dogs Give Up Their Lives to Save Family

June 4, 2008

Bella, a 3-year-old golden retriever/collie mix who was once rescued as an abused puppy, returned the favor to her owners by alerting them to a house fire. With help from Maddie, a 6-month-old golden retriever, Bella helped get Sue Feuling and her 9-year-old daughter, Mckenzie, out of the house last week. The dogs didn’t make it.

”Those dogs were without a doubt the heroes,” said Winona Assistant Fire Chief Jim Multhaup.

Bella had jumped on Feuling’s bed early Friday morning and started barking, and Feuling then smelled smoke, grabbed her daughter and rushed out of the house.

But Feuling couldn’t coax the dogs out of the house, even when she tried to run back in to yell for them.

”Bella must have thought Mckenzie was still in the house,” Feuling said.

A firefighter who arrived at the scene tried to save the dogs, but it was too late. The Feulings were taken to an area hospital for smoke inhalation monitoring, but were OK, Multhaup said.

The fire, which was caused by an overloaded electrical outlet, gutted the home, Multhaup said.

While an assistance fund was set up, Sue Feuling said she was only thinking about her dogs. ”Everything I lost is nothing compared to them,” she said.

Information from: Winona Daily News, http://www.winonadailynews.com

Clicks to get food donated to abused & neglected animals

May 8, 2008

This is pretty simple. Please tell your friends to tell their friends today! The Animal Rescue Site is having trouble getting enough people to click on it daily to meet their quota of getting free food donated every day to abused and neglected animals.

It takes less than a minute to go to their site and click on the purple box ‘fund food for animals’ for free. This doesn’t cost you a thing. Their corporate sponsors/advertisers use the number of daily visits to donate food to abandoned/neglected animals in exchange for advertising.

Here’s the web site…please pass it along to people you know.

http://www.theanimalrescuesite.com

Again, Please Send to All People Who Care About Animals!
P.S. The above can be verified by clicking on this snopes link: http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/charity/animalrescue.asp

Wounded Bald Eagle May Get Bionic Beak

May 8, 2008

An American Bald Eagle was found with it’s top beak shot off, tragically leaving it unable to tear its prey or feed itself. The Raptor Chapter of Idaho and a team of volunteer research engineers are looking at giving the eagle, named Beauty, a bionic beak.

Read about the mechanical engineers with real heart — and read news about them.